Super Bowl Storylines


By Rick Horrow and Karla Swatek

January 28, 2013

Post-Katrina Revitalization- Prior to 2005, New Orleans had hosted the Super Bowl a record nine times. This is the first time the city is hosting the game since Hurricane Katrina. The 11-year gap in hosting (2002-13) is by far New Orleans’ biggest in the Super Bowl’s history.

Dome renovations- Superdome renovations since 2006 have totaled $336 million. These renovations were to repair the building after Hurricane Katrina while help get New Orleans back into the Super Bowl rotation. Upgrades include wider concourses, new concession stand & restrooms, and a restoration of the outer skin. Without these renovations, not only would New Orleans not have the Super Bowl, they might also not have the Saints. Relocating to San Antonio was a real possibility after Hurricane Katrina.

Bountygate- NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell just reinstated Saints head coach Sean Payton, who had been suspended for one-year for his involvement in the Bountygate scandal. New Orleans had aspirations of playing in this Super Bowl in front of its home crowd, but they didn’t even make the playoffs. Is the NFL a savior for bringing the game back to New Orleans, or a villain for ruining the Saints’ season?

New Orleans Economy- Since the start of 2012, New Orleans has hosted the BCS National Championship, the NCAA men’s Final Four, and two Sugar Bowls. This year they host the Super Bowl and women’s Final Four. Next year they host the NBA All-Star Game. The economic impact of all these events will far exceed $1 billion.

Television- CBS will broadcast the game. The network this season paid $622 million for its NFL rights. Super Bowl commercials this year are averaging a record $3.7-3.8 million per 30-seconds. Some ads have sold for more than $4 million, also a record. Estimated ad revenue for CBS: $263 million (approx. 70 spots * $3.75 million average).

Teams- The San Francisco 49ers are one of the NFL’s most iconic teams. The Baltimore Ravens, founded in 1996, are one of the newest. According to Forbes, the 49ers are the 9th most valuable NFL team at $1.18 billion, while the Ravens are the 11th most valuable at $1.16 billion. In comparing owner worth, the Ravens’ Steve Bisciotti is the 298th richest American at $1.6 billion. 49ers owner Denise York ranks 392nd at $1.1 billion.

The HarBowl- The Harbaugh brothers will go up against each other in the Super Bowl, as John is the head coach for the Ravens and Jim is the head coach for the 49ers. The two will exchange text messages in the week leading up to the game, but they won’t talk on the phone. They’ll hold a joint new conference two days before the game. As hard as this must be for their parents, it’s guaranteed that one will win and one will lose.

On to New York- Next season, the Super Bowl moves to New York. It’ll be the first Super Bowl in a cold city whose stadium doesn’t have a roof. Expect more cold-weather cities to start bidding on the game. After New York, the league still hasn’t decided who will host the illustrious Super Bowl 50, with Miami and Santa Clara the finalists.

Super Bowl “Balance Sheet”

Revenues

Super Bowl economic impact: New Orleans projects $423 million

- Indianapolis last year generated $323 million

Tickets street value: $237 million (76,000 seats * $3,100 average)

Super Bowl merchandise revenue: $150 million

Super Bowl gambling: $100 million legally in Vegas (est. $1+ billion illegally)

Expenses

Infrastructure - $1.2 billion on various public/private improvement projects

- Road work, new streetcar line construction, Louis Armstrong International Airport improvements and private renovations by hotels, restaurants and other businesses

New Orleans host committee – Raised $13.5 million in preparation for the Super Bowl

- Of that $13.5 million, $6 million came from Louisiana and $7.5 million came from 27 corporate sponsors.

- Spending includes holding a free riverfront festival that will include 49 bands, food from 17 restaurants and 12 parades




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