Misplaced Includings

When you use the word including, be careful about what you place after it. Consider the following:

Practice Perfect Baseball sports a roster of top contributors covering the topics they know best, including Keith Madison, Terry Rooney, and Mark Johnson.

Because the word including is placed directly after the topics they know best, the words that follow including should be a list of the topics they know best. But instead, it's a list of people's names. (In other words, it's misplaced . . . unless Keith Madison, Terry Rooney, and Mark Johnson are the topics the contributors know best. Not likely, though.) If your intention is to list some of the contributors, do it this way:

Practice Perfect Baseball sports a roster of top contributors, including Keith Madison, Terry Rooney, and Mark Johnson, who cover the topics they know best.


Let's suppose the author does want to emphasize the topics they know best. In that case, here's a solution:

Practice Perfect Baseball sports a roster of top contributors covering the topics they know best, including fielding, base running, and catching.

And one more thing to note about including: When you use including and follow that with a list of items, don't end the list with and more or and so on or etc. That's redundant. Here's an erroneous example:

Lopes, the most successful U.S. mountain biker, offers advice on a variety of topics, including pumping and braking techniques to increase speed in the turns, jumps and tricks, equipment selection, and more.


It's saying including and more, which doesn't make sense. Use of the word including automatically suggests that what follows isn't an exhaustive list. Here's an edit:

Lopes, the most successful U.S. mountain biker, offers advice on a variety of topics, including pumping and braking techniques to increase speed in the turns, jumps and tricks, and equipment selection.