Style Rules for Internet Jargon

The Internet has brought about many new vocabulary words. Here's a refresher on HK styles for such terms:

blog (but web log when spelling out the whole thing)
e-mail (not email); hyphenate anything with the beginning e that indicates electronic, such as e-book or e-zine
Internet (yes, it's capitalized)
key code (two words)
log in (verb), as in "Log in here"
log out (verb)
login (noun, adjective), as in "Use your login name"
sign up (verb), as in "Sign up here"
sign-up (noun, adjective), as in "Go to the sign-up page"
website (yes, we're now following the style that everyone uses in everyday correspondence; it's no longer Web site)

For button names, use headline case, no quotes:

Log In

In running text, when referring to button names, use headline case, no quotes:

Type in your user name and password and click the Log In button.

A printed book does not contain web links. It contains URLs. A link is a string of hypertext characters that you can activate by clicking on it. You can't click on anything in a printed book. So if, in a printed book, you see the word hyperlink or link, change it to URL.

A recent trend is to use en dashes with spaces rather than the traditional em dashes without spaces. Don't follow that en-dash trend because it looks extremely sloppy. Use colons or periods or em dashes. Here is an example of a quasi-heading in a web document:

Bad
Ambassadors - Are you well connected with active aging organizations in your country?

Good
Ambassadors. Are you well connected with active aging organizations in your country?
Ambassadors: Are you well connected with active aging organizations in your country?
Ambassadors--Are you well connected with active aging organizations in your country?