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Introducing students to the HEAT Club

This is an excerpt from The Healthy Eating and Active Time Club Curriculum by Christina Economos, Jessica Collins, Sonya Irish Hauser, Erin Hennessy, David Hudson, Erin Boyd Kappelhof, Sandra Klemmer, Claire Kozower, and Lori Marcotte.


Lesson 1

 

HEAT Club Kickoff

This lesson introduces students to the HEAT Club. The overarching goal for this unit is to help students understand that food is fuel for the body, much like gas is fuel for a car. By making healthy choices, students feed their bodies and their minds.


The class will also experience the benefits of regular movement through the Cool Moves included in the lesson (and in all subsequent lessons). They will begin to under- stand that physical activity uses the fuel provided by the food they eat and can also leave them energized.


As you welcome students to the HEAT club, gather information from the class about their views on healthy eating and active time. As an example, you can create a web of answers and questions to be answered as you work your way through the program (see figure 1.1).

Objectives

  • Know the goals of the HEAT Club.
  • Learn simple stretches.
  • Understand that healthy bodies need to move and be fueled by healthy foods in order to grow, play, and learn.
  • Identify healthy foods and activities.

Preparation


Read about the background of the HEAT Club in appendix A. 


 

Materials (WR)

Activity books (one per student)

 

Cool Moves (WR)

  • Hug Yourself Stretch—Standing up, students cross their arms and wrap them around their bodies as far as they can stretch. Then they turn the upper body to the right and left. Continue for 20 seconds. They then recross arms so the other arm is on top. Repeat the stretch for 20 seconds.
  • Ostrich Stretch—Students stand with legs straight and bend over at the waist (as far as they can comfortably go) to try to touch their toes (imitating an ostrich sticking its head in the sand). They stay in this position for 5 seconds. Repeat three to five times. Remind students not to hold their breath or lock their knees during the stretch.

Refer to the web resource to learn more Cool Moves.

Key Talking Points

  • The HEAT in HEAT Club stands for healthy eating and active time. The lessons and activities we do as part of the HEAT Club show us ways to eat smart and play hard.
  • Cool Moves give us active breaks during the school day. Moving energizes us so we can focus on learning.
  • Our bodies are healthy and happy when we move them and when we feed them healthy foods.

  1. Welcome students to the HEAT Club and distribute HEAT Club activity books. Ask each student to write his or her name on the cover (they can decorate these later).
  2. Direct students to page 1 of the activity book: “What does HEAT stand for?” Explain that HEAT stands for healthy eating and active time. Ask students to write these words on page 1. Explain that the club will teach them ways to eat smart and play hard. Ask the class to tell you what these things mean. Children at this age might not understand what being active means; they might consider anything other than sleeping to be active. Help them distinguish activities that move their bodies in an active way (such as playing tag or basketball) from those that do not move their bodies (such as watching TV or playing a video game).
  3. Teach students some Cool Moves; tell them that throughout the year they will do Cool Moves to stay active during class.
  4. Lead them in the HEAT Club cheer (“Give me an H! Give me an E!” and so on).
  5. Ask students, “What does ‘healthy’ mean?”
    • Healthy means our bodies are growing and working so we can feel our best.
    • Healthy means eating the colors of the rainbow. Healthy foods give us fuel to keep our bodies strong and working well. When we eat healthy foods, we feel good.
    • Remind students that food helps our bodies grow and gives us fuel to run and play. Eating healthy foods also helps us do well in school.
    • Healthy means being active. Being active works our muscles, bones, lungs, and heart so they become strong. Being active can also help us do well in school.
  6. Together, brainstorm a list of healthy foods and a list of active-time activities. Write students’ ideas on the board. Remind students that during active time, their bodies are moving.
  7. Invite students to decorate the cover of their activity books with pictures of themselves eating smart and playing hard.

  1. Welcome students to the HEAT Club and distribute HEAT Club activity books. Ask each student to write his or her name on the cover (they can decorate these later).
  2. Direct students to page 1 of the activity book: “What does HEAT stand for?” Explain that HEAT stands for healthy eating and active time. Ask students to write these words on page 1. Explain that the HEAT Club will teach them ways to eat smart and play hard. Ask the class to tell you what these things mean. Children
  3. At this age might not understand what being active means; they might consider anything other than sleeping to be active. Help them distinguish activities that move their bodies in an active way (such as playing tag or basketball) from those that do not move their bodies (such as watching TV or playing a video game).
  4. Teach students some Cool Moves and tell them that throughout the year they will do Cool Moves to stay active during class. Moving helps them be more successful in school.
  5. Lead them in the HEAT Club cheer (“Give me an H! Give me an E!” and so on).
  6. Ask students, “What does ‘healthy’ mean?”
    • Healthy means our bodies are growing and working so we can feel our best.
    • Healthy means eating the colors of the rainbow. Healthy foods give us fuel to keep our bodies strong and working well. When we eat healthy foods, we feel good.
    • Remind students that food helps our bodies grow and gives us fuel to run and play. Eating healthy foods also helps us do well in school.
    • Healthy means being active. Being active works our muscles, bones, lungs, and heart so they become strong. Being active can also help us do well in school.
  7. Direct students to page 2 of the activity book: Healthy Eating, Active Time. Ask them to write down at least one example under each of these categories: healthy eating, not-so-healthy eating, active time, and inactive time. Students may work together to come up with ideas.
  8. Write each of the four categories on the board, and record students’ responses. Are there more items under healthy eating and active time, or under not-so- healthy eating and inactive time? Discuss.
  9. Remind students that when they choose healthy foods their bodies get energy and nutrients to grow, play, and learn. Explain that we all need to include active time in our days because moving our bodies helps us build strong muscles, bones, lungs, and hearts. Being active can also help us feel more energized throughout the day. For instance, students might feel more awake after going for a walk (explored further in lesson 7).
  10. If time allows, students may decorate their activity books with pictures of them- selves eating smart and playing hard.

  1. Welcome students to the HEAT Club and distribute HEAT Club activity books. Ask each student to write his or her name on the cover (they can decorate these later).
  2. Direct students to page 1 of the activity book: “What does HEAT stand for?” Explain that HEAT stands for healthy eating and active time. Ask students to write these words on page 1. Explain that the HEAT Club will teach them ways to eat smart and play hard. Ask the class to tell you what these things mean. Children at this age might not understand what being active means; they might consider anything other than sleeping to be active. Help them distinguish activities that move their bodies in an active way (such as playing tag or basketball) from those that do not move their bodies (such as watching TV or playing a video game).
  3. Teach students some Cool Moves and tell them that throughout the year they will do Cool Moves to stay active during class. Moving helps them be more successful in school.
  4. Lead them in the HEAT Club cheer (“Give me an H! Give me an E!” and so on).
  5. Ask students, “What does ‘healthy’ mean?”
    • Healthy means our bodies are growing and working so we can feel our best.
    • Healthy means eating the colors of the rainbow. Healthy foods give us fuel to keep our bodies strong and working well. When we eat healthy foods, we feel good.
    • Remind students that food helps our bodies grow and gives us fuel to run and play. Eating healthy foods also helps us do well in school.
    • Healthy means being active. Being active works our muscles, bones, lungs, and heart so they become strong. Being active can also help us do well in school.
  6. Direct students to page 2 of the activity book: HEAT Club Brainstorm! Divide the class into groups of four or five. Instruct half the groups to brainstorm and record a list of healthy foods and the other half to brainstorm and record a list of active-time activities.
  7. Remind students that when they move their bodies, they build strong muscles, bones, lungs, and hearts. Food provides them with the fuel and energy they need to grow, learn, and play.
  8. Invite students to share their lists. Create one large list on the board of healthy foods and active-time activities. If necessary, help the class identify foods or activities that do not belong on the list (e.g., French fries or playing video games).
  9. If time allows, students may decorate their activity books with pictures of them- selves eating smart and playing hard.

(2nd, 3rd) Extension Activity: HEAT Club Survey

  1. 1. Instruct students to interview five other students and ask them about their favor- 
ite healthy foods and physical activities.
  2. As the class shares results, create a chart to illustrate the different foods and activities that people enjoy. Identify the most popular choices and discuss.

Go Green Connection

  • The HEAT Club will teach you ways to take care of your body, but we should also always consider ways to take care of our planet. Throughout this curriculum, we will provide simple tips for you and your students to pitch in and be environmen- tally friendly.
  • Taking care of our bodies and taking care of the environment often go hand in hand. Just as eating too much junk food can harm our bodies, putting too much junk (trash) into our communities can harm the environment. In this activity, we learned about reducing the amount of not-so-healthy foods we put into our bodies.
  • What are some not-so-healthy things we put into the environment? How can we reduce them? (Example: using a cloth towel instead of a paper towel)
  • See appendix B for more ideas on going green.

Read more from The Healthy Eating and Active Time Club Curriculum by Christina Economos, Jessica Collins, Sonya Irish Hauser, Erin Hennessy, David Hudson, Erin Boyd Kappelhof, Sandra Klemmer, Claire Kozower, and Lori Marcotte.



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