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Drills for executing goal-line pass routes

This is an excerpt from Football Skills & Drills, Second Edition By Thomas Bass.


Learn more about pass routes in Football Skills & Drills.

Goal-Line Pass Routes

Because of the limited area available to run pass routes when a team is near the opponent’s goal line, one or two special routes should be designed specifically for this area. Routes that can be effective in this area are the fade route and the pivot in or pivot out pass.

Fade Route. A fade pass is thrown to the back corner pylon of the end zone. The receiver needs to line up far enough from the sideline so that he has room to release outside the defender and take a path to the pylon. The quarterback should loft the ball, and the receiver should run under it while making certain that he stays inbounds as he makes the reception. Ideally, the ball should come over the receiver’s outside shoulder, but the receiver must be prepared to adjust to the flight of the ball. This route is especially good for a tall receiver who can go up and make the catch
(figure 5.9).

Fade Route

Purpose:To give the wide receiver experience executing the fade route.

Procedure:

1. The coach lines up in the quarterback position and calls for a fade route.

2. The receiver lines up on the 5-yard line and adjusts his position so that he is at least 8 to 10 yards from the sideline.

3. On the coach’s command, the wide receiver takes an outside release and angles toward the pylon in the corner of the end zone.

4. As he moves to the pylon, the receiver must look back, locate the ball, and determine where the ball will be when it reaches his hands.

5. The coach observes the wide receiver’s movements and provides feedback.

6. A quarterback can throw the ball after the receiver understands and can run the route correctly.

Coaching points: The receiver must line up so that he has room to run the route. He must look back to locate the flight of the ball as soon as he is moving to the pylon. Because this is a spot timing route, the quarterback and receiver will need to get a lot of repetitions to refine the play.

Pivot Routes. To execute a pivot route, either to the inside or the outside, a receiver needs to convince the defender that he is going to run the original route and continue on his original path. This route is effective against an aggressive defender who will try to jump the initial move.

For a pivot in pass, the receiver starts on a quick out route. After taking two steps, he plants his upfield foot, pivots back, leans his body back to the inside, and comes back to the quarterback. The receiver should look for the ball the instant that he turns back to the inside of the field.

For the pivot out pass, the receiver starts on a slant route. After taking two steps, he plants his outside foot, pivots back, leans his body back to the outside, and runs to the sideline (figure 5.10). The receiver should look for the ball the instant that he turns back to the outside of the field.

Pivot In and Pivot Out Routes

Purpose:To give the wide receiver experience executing a pivot in and pivot out route.

Procedure:

1. The coach lines up in the quarterback position and calls for a pivot route.

2. The receiver lines up on the 5-yard line and adjusts his position so that he is at least 8 to 10 yards from the sideline.

3. On the coach’s command, the wide receiver takes an outside release and starts his initial pass route.

4. After two steps on his initial pass route, the receiver pivots back in the opposite direction and immediately looks for the ball.

5. The coach observes the wide receiver’s movements and provides feedback.

6. A quarterback can throw the ball after the receiver understands and can run both routes correctly.

Coaching points: The receiver must line up so that he has room to run both phases of the route. The coach should check that the receiver immediately looks back to the quarterback when he comes out of his pivot. Because this is a timing route, the quarterback and receiver will need to get a lot of repetitions to refine the play.


Read more from Football Skills & Drills, Second Edition By Thomas Bass.



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Football Skills & Drills 2nd Edition eBook
Master the fundamentals for consistent execution. Veteran NFL and college coach Tom Bass offers step-by-step instruction to teach the game’s essential skills: tackling, passing, catching, blocking, and kicking. Full-color photos and 114 drills reinforce proper technique for individual and team success.
€22.10
Football Skills & Drills-2nd Edition
Master the fundamentals for consistent execution. Veteran NFL and college coach Tom Bass offers step-by-step instruction to teach the game’s essential skills: tackling, passing, catching, blocking, and kicking. Full-color photos and 114 drills reinforce proper technique for individual and team success.
€22.10

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