Shopping Basket 0
Human Kinetics Publishers, Inc.

HUMAN KINETICS

Physical Activity Reduces Risk of Some Cancers

In Canada, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death. One of the main risk factors for this cancer is older age; another important risk factor is physical inactivity.

By Patricia Clark, National Executive Director, Active Living Coalition for Older Adults



Articles and Links


The National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, seeks research grant applications from institutions and organizations that propose translational research in the overlapping areas of human aging and cancer.


Documents


Physical Activity and Cancer: Active Living Tips for Older Adults (pdf)
download now
ALCOA Active Living Tips for Older Adults- Physical Activity and Cancer: From Prevention to Recovery. This is tool that practitioners can share with their patients and clients.
Physical Activity and Cancer: From Prevention to Recovery (pdf)
download now
ALCOA Research Update- Physical Activity and Cancer: From Prevention to Recovery. Practical, leading edge research results applied to physical activity for older adults, in plain language for health practitioners and leaders.


In Canada, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death. One of the main risk factors for this cancer is older age; another important risk factor is physical inactivity.

Physical activity may protect against colon cancer because it speeds the passage of food through the gastrointestinal tract. This reduces how long the body is exposed to potential carcinogens (such as bile acids), to hormones which stimulate cell division (mitogens, including insulin-like growth factors or IGF), and to free radicals that damage DNA. Physical activity also increases immune responses by those cells that can kill tumor cells (at least in lab experiments). However, there is little empirical evidence to show exactly how physical activity helps protect against colon cancer in people.

Physical activity helps prevent breast cancer

Many observational studies have shown that physically active women are less at risk of breast cancer than women who are inactive. So far, no research has used randomized controlled trials to prove that exercise causes the reduced risk.

Nevertheless, studies of groups of women have shown that 3 to 4 hours a week of vigorous activity can cut the risk of breast cancer by about 30 to 40%. The risk is reduced even more for postmenopausal women. Women who were physically active as adolescents (at age 12) were less likely to develop breast cancer than women who were less physically active as teenagers.

How exercise affects older cancer survivors

Studies also suggest that aerobic and resistance exercise programs can benefit older prostate cancer survivors, even while they are receiving treatments such as hormone therapy and radiation therapy.

For more information, visit the Active Living Coalition for Older Adults website at http://www.alcoa.ca/.

 




Get the latest news, special offers, and updates on authors and products. SIGN UP NOW!

Human Kinetics Rewards

About Our Products

Book Excerpts

Catalogs

News and Articles

About Us

Career Opportunities

Events

Partners

Business to Business

Author Center

HK Today Newsletter

Services

Exam/Desk Copies

Language rights translation

Association Management

Associate Program

Rights and Permissions

Featured Programs

Human Kinetics Coach Education

Fitnessgram

Fitness for Life

Active Living Every Day

Connect with Us

Google Plus YouTube Tumblr Pinterest

Terms & Conditions

/

Privacy Policy

/

Safe Harbor